LandCAN Conservation Success Stories

Browse our Growing Library of Success Stories

Garrett Ranch

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Garrett RanchUsing the money from the sale of his Texaco gas station in 1937, Labon Garrett, along with his father and grandfather, Henry and Adron, purchased the first 2,000 acres of Garrett Ranch. The ranch now belongs to Pete, Labon’s son, and Pete’s wife, Ethel, who manage the ranch activities with their children and grandchildren.  

 

Golden Willow Ranch

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Golden Willow RanchThe 2007 Leopold Conservation Award for Wyoming is presented to Paul and Catherine Kukowski and their family. The Kukowskis run more than 800 head of cattle on their 20,000-acre Golden Willow Ranch in Sheridan County.

 

King Ranch

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King RanchThe century-old King Ranch sits just outside of Cheyenne. After the passing of one of the ranch owners, the ranch management was left in the hands of Mark Eisele, who has worked on the ranch since the 1970s. Today, Mark, along with his wife Trudy and their family, proudly carry on the ranching tradition at King Ranch.

 

Padlock Ranch

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Padlock RanchHomer and Mildred Scott started Padlock Ranch in 1943 with 300 cows and 3000 acres purchased in the Dayton, Wyoming area. Little did they know the ranch would grow to run 11,000 head of cattle on approximately 475,000 acres straddling the Wyoming/Montana state line.

 

Pape Ranches

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Pape RanchesNorm Pape will tell you that family is the most important factor in the success of Pape Ranches. The operation is run entirely by Norm and Barbara Pape and their sons, David and Fred, and their families.

 

Sommers Ranch

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Sommers RanchThe Sommers family has been ranching cattle in Sublette County, Wyoming since 1907 when Albert “Prof” Sommers and his brother, Pearl, established the ranch.

 

SR Cattle Company

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SR Cattle CompanyIn 1882, the Kane family patriarch, Philip Kane, staked his claim to 320 acres at the base of the Big Horn Mountains along Big Goose Creek. The ranch has undergone a lot of changes over the years, growing into roughly 30,320 acres and running about 1100 cows and 240 yearling replacement heifers. The fourth generation ranch is currently owned and managed by David and his wife Terri, and will be shepherded into the fifth generation by their son Nate.

 

Sherwood Acres

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Sherwood AcresThirteen years ago, with no real farming experience, Jon and Sylvia Bednarski purchased 35 acres at the headwater of Harrods Creek in LaGrange, Kentucky. Having grown up in rural America, Jon and Sylvia had a dream that their own children would share that lifestyle and grow up in similar fashion.

 

Springhill Farms

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Springhill FarmsWhile growing up in Hickman County in western Kentucky, Jerry Peery operated a tractor on his father’s farm starting at the age of seven. He farmed side-by-side with him during his teenage years, and began farming on his own after graduating from high school in 1957.

 

Tallow Creek Farm

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Tallow Creek FarmWhile working tirelessly at their jobs running a custom injection molding firm, Ray Pelle and his son Harry decided to pursue their dream of owning land to reconnect with nature and hunt. Ray bought the first 400-acre tract of land in 1982 in the knobby Tallow Creek area of northern Taylor County. After Ray’s passing in 2003, Harry and his wife Karen continued to follow the dream and have since added another 1,100 acres of forest onto Tallow Creek Farm. 

 

Trunnell Family Farm

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Trunnell Family FarmAchieving soil health through the use of no-till farming and cover crops is nothing new to Edward (Myrel) Trunnell, who began farming more than six decades ago. Conservation is synonymous with his idea of farming.

 

Turner Family Farms

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Turner Family FarmsConservation ethics were instilled in Mark Turner at a young age while helping his father on the family farm. When Mark took over Turner Farms, he saw the negative effects on the land from the moldboard plow, and decided to purchase his first no-till drill in 1983. The farm is now no-till and cover cropped on every acre.

 

West Wind Farm

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West Wind FarmTo many in Munfordville, Charlie Williams is simply known as “the tree man.” From a young age, Charlie developed a passion for woodland stewardship after he received 90 acres of land from his grandfather for Christmas. He has nurtured and expanded his landholdings into 1,200 acres, including over 1,000 acres of woodlands.

 

Uptown Farms

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Uptown FarmsMatt and Kate Lambert of Uptown Farms were the inaugural recipients of the Missouri Leopold Conservation Award®, which honors Missouri landowner achievement in voluntary stewardship and management of natural resources.

 

4-O Ranches

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4-O RanchesA.B. Cox is a third generation Sandhill rancher. His family has been ranching in CherryCounty for 103 years. He and his daughter, Scout, manage their cow/calf/yearling Calf Creek and 4-O Ranches, consisting of approximately 23,000 acres, with two invaluable employees, Gerry Ashwege and Justin Duffield.

 

Beel Ranch

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Beel RanchIn 1937, Henry O. Beel purchased land located on the Brown and Cherry County line in the Sandhills of Nebraska. His son, Henry C. Beel, joined him 23 years later, and a legacy was born. In 1990, the third generation of Beels assumed stewardship of the nearly 22,000-acre cattle operation. Celebrating 75 years on the ranch, the Beel Family takes pride in looking back on the progress they have made, and looks forward to what lies ahead for future generations.

 

Bluestem Valley Farms

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Bluestem Valley FarmsBluestem Valley Farms is a fourth generation family operation consisting of farming and ranching near Martell. Lyle and Alice Sittler and their daughter and son-in-law, Kristen and Todd Eggerling, work together to maintain all facets of the operation.

 

K & W Farms

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K & W FarmsKurt and Wayne Kaup own and manage K & W Farms in Stuart, Neb., where they raise hogs and crops on the eastern edge of the Sandhills. With a commitment to improving natural resources, the Kaups are leaders in implementing no-till farming strategies combined with irrigation water management and the use of cover crops to improve the health of the soil, reduce erosion and recycle nutrients. Cover crops, in conjunction with the no-till farming, are promoting more soil organic matter and increasing the waterholding capacity of the soil.

 

Kalkowski Family Ranches

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Kalkowski Family RanchesKalkowski Family Ranches consists of land that Larry Kalkowski purchased and managed during his lifetime, as well as other land purchased by his four sons and their wives as a continuation of the main ranch.

 

Thomas Daniels and The Law of Agricultural Land Preservation

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Conservations easements can be complex. Thomas Daniels breaks down the legal principles, federal and state requirements, and the legal issues that affect agricultural land preservation efforts.