LandCAN Conservation Success Stories

Browse our Growing Library of Success Stories

Golden Willow Ranch

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Golden Willow RanchThe 2007 Leopold Conservation Award for Wyoming is presented to Paul and Catherine Kukowski and their family. The Kukowskis run more than 800 head of cattle on their 20,000-acre Golden Willow Ranch in Sheridan County.

 

King Ranch

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King RanchThe century-old King Ranch sits just outside of Cheyenne. After the passing of one of the ranch owners, the ranch management was left in the hands of Mark Eisele, who has worked on the ranch since the 1970s. Today, Mark, along with his wife Trudy and their family, proudly carry on the ranching tradition at King Ranch.

 

Padlock Ranch

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Padlock RanchHomer and Mildred Scott started Padlock Ranch in 1943 with 300 cows and 3000 acres purchased in the Dayton, Wyoming area. Little did they know the ranch would grow to run 11,000 head of cattle on approximately 475,000 acres straddling the Wyoming/Montana state line.

 

Pape Ranches

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Pape RanchesNorm Pape will tell you that family is the most important factor in the success of Pape Ranches. The operation is run entirely by Norm and Barbara Pape and their sons, David and Fred, and their families.

 

Sommers Ranch

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Sommers RanchThe Sommers family has been ranching cattle in Sublette County, Wyoming since 1907 when Albert “Prof” Sommers and his brother, Pearl, established the ranch.

 

SR Cattle Company

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SR Cattle CompanyIn 1882, the Kane family patriarch, Philip Kane, staked his claim to 320 acres at the base of the Big Horn Mountains along Big Goose Creek. The ranch has undergone a lot of changes over the years, growing into roughly 30,320 acres and running about 1100 cows and 240 yearling replacement heifers. The fourth generation ranch is currently owned and managed by David and his wife Terri, and will be shepherded into the fifth generation by their son Nate.

 

Farming for a Future of Healthy Soil, Clean Water

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In rural Indiana, Ray McCormick plants cover crops – and trees – to protect farms and rivers. It’s a conservation practice Ray uses on “every acre” to improve soil health, prevent erosion and reduce nutrient runoff from his farm into the Wabash River, a 500-mile-long tributary of the Mississippi River. 


 

No Jimmy Buffet Here

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The marsh represents more than a good place to fish or a spot to play in the water. The marsh serves as a hurricane buffer, a sort of natural sponge that can absorb just about the worst that nature can throw at the Texas coastline.


 

He Speaks For The Sea

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Whale watch guide includes puffins in his repertoire Whale watch guide includes puffins in his repertoire


 

Lending a Helping Hoof

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Dairy Farmer Brings Together Turtles and Cows


 

Serenity In The Slough

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The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service works with partners to recover the southern sea otter and educate the public about their important role in our coastal ecosystems. 


 

Trip Of A Lifetime

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Jamieson is a self-described “fan of the refuge idea.” He knows his conservation history and can thoroughly explain how hunters have been instrumental in funding wildlife management and research, and restoring game populations.


 

Flexing Mussel Populations

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Westervelt, along with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, placed 335 federally threatened orangenacre muckets — mussels — into the creek with hopes of revitalizing a near-extinct species.


 

A Cud Above

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Through a public-private agreement, the ranchers graze their cattle on a 719-acre vernal pool grassland at the Warm Springs unit of the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge. With this pact, they’re keeping alive a ranching and land conservation heritage spanning four generations. The grazing, in turn, offers a host of benefits for endangered species at the seasonal pond.


 

Tied To The River

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The Davis family signed a conservation easement in September 2017 with the Virginia Outdoors Foundation. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) assisted, helping ensure that 2.3 miles of verdant riverfront land will not be developed. The agreement is proof, too, that conservation and private enterprise can coexist — and even thrive.


 

A Marriage of Opposites

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Nadya Seal Faith is a conservation biologist with the Santa Barbara Zoo; Luke Faith is a foreman for Seneca Resources Inc., an oil-production company.


 

Artifacts Of Epoch's Past

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Rio Grande trout benefit from private lands conservation


 

Bringing back the “Prince of Game Birds”

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Bob Spiering, with the help of the USDA and the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, worked to bring back the bobwhite quail to his farm


 

A Ripple Effect

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Texas Lawyer transformed part of Prairie Creek into a habitat where river otter, white-tailed deer and other wildlife thrive


 

The Homeplace Past The Hollow

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Practices preserve farm for future generations