LandCAN Conservation Success Stories

Browse our Growing Library of Success Stories

Plum Thicket Farm

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Plum Thicket FarmLocated on the northern edge of the Nebraska Sandhills is Plum Thicket Farms, a diverse crop farm and cattle ranch owned and managed by Rex and Nancy Peterson, and their son Patrick and his wife Krista.

 

RGM Corporation

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RGM CorporationRodney Mathewson started a small farming and cattle operation near Potter, Nebraska in the 1940’s. His commitment to the health of the natural resources in his care was instilled in his son, Randy, and grandson, Beau, who run the ranch with their wives, Gina and Kahla, respectively.

 

Rod & Amy Christen

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Rod & Amy ChristenRod and Amy Christen represent the next generation in outstanding land stewardship. Together with Rod’s father, Richard, and sister, Kay, Rod and Amy run a 275-head cow/calf operation near Steinauer, Nebraska.

 

RuJoDen Ranch

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RuJoDen RanchThe O’Rourkes have implemented a variety of conservation practices to their land that has been in their family since 1950.

 

Shaw Family Farms

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Shaw Family FarmsNestled in the heart of Nebraska’s Rainwater Basin is Shaw Family Farms, a fifth generation row-crop and cattle ranch owned and managed by Steve and Vicki Shaw and their son and daughter-in-law Brian and Julie Shaw. The Shaw’s belief is that they have been successful “not just because of hard work, but also because of the land ethic passed down from the first generation.”

 

Shovel Dot Ranch

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Shovel Dot RanchThe Buell family is part of the fabric of the Nebraska Sandhills. For nearly 130 years, they have ranched in the region, while caring for the land, water, and wildlife that each Buell generation passed on to the next.

 

Wilson Ranch

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Wilson RanchWilson Ranch, located northeast of Lakeside in the Nebraska Sandhills, is a fifth-gen­eration operation owned and managed by brothers Blaine and Bryan Wilson. The ranch consists of over 15,000 acres and over 1,100 head of cattle. The Wilson Ranch is a terrific example of economic viability co-existing with sustained conservation practices.

 

Black Leg Ranch

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Black Leg RanchIn the late 1800s, Jerry Doan’s great grandfather, George H. Doan, moved from Canada to homestead in the Dakota Territory. What began as a 160-acre homestead with a sod house has grown into a 17,000-acre farm and ranch. Jerry and his wife Renae own and manage the fourth and fifth generation Black Leg Ranch, and their children are poised to take the reins in the coming years.

 

Miller Ranch

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Miller RanchWhen Ken Miller took over the family ranch in the 80s, he knew the management practices he was taught growing up would need to evolve if he expected to pass on the family ranch legacy onto his children. In 1984, Ken and his wife Bonnie received a sponsorship to attend a holistic resource management school in Albuquerque, New Mexico. There they began to realize that their current management had little reasoning behind it besides the fact that it was “the way things were done”.

 

Wilson Family Farm

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Wilson Family FarmDescribed by some as “pioneers” when it comes to demonstrating the importance of soil health, Jeremy and Sarah Wilson are showing that agricultural conservation can profit while improving the productivity of their land.   

 

Emmons Farm

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Emmons FarmConservation has been a cornerstone of the Emmons family approach for generations. Back in 1934, when a big flood occurred, Jimmy Emmons’ grandfather witnessed all of the topsoil to the depth of the plough plane had washed off into the river. The event became a personal warning sign of the need for soil and water conservation. Jimmy’s father would later experience a similar event.

 

Blue Bell Ranch

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Blue Bell RanchWhen you ask Herb Hamann about his conservation ethic and why he goes the extra mile to improve the land, he will simply give a shrug of the shoulders and say that “it’s just the right thing to do.” Herb and his wife Bev, along with their children, Breck and Arla, own and manage Blue Bell Ranch. The family is strong in their belief that their base asset is the grassland itself, and the cows are simply the tool to harvest the grass. 

 

Cammack Ranch

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Cammack RanchWith its commitment to conservation, Cammack Ranch is a place where soil, grass, cattle, wildlife and a family legacy all thrive.

 

Cronin Farms

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Cronin FarmsCronin Farms was established in 1910, when Carl Cronin moved from Nebraska to South Dakota. Ever since the beginning, the farm has been a diverse mix-livestock and crop enterprise. Today the farm is managed by Monty and Mike Cronin, along with their agronomy manager Dan Forgey.

 

Doud Ranch

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Doud RanchRick and Marlis Doud’s ranch, near Midland, is comprised of 6,000 deeded acres and 2,500 leased acres on which they run nearly 400 cow-calf pairs.

 

Guptill Ranch

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Guptill RanchGuptill Ranch is a 7,000-acre cattle operation that Pat and Mary Lou Guptill have owned and managed for the past 25 years. With their five children, they are caretakers of this special landscape in western South Dakota. The area features grasslands with rolling hills and a wooded creek running through the ranch.

 

Jorgensen Land & Cattle Partnership

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Jorgensen Land & Cattle PartnershipThe Jorgensens have made a living from farming and ranching for more than 100 years. Humbly beginning as a small family farm, Jorgensen Land and Cattle Partnership has grown to include livestock, a large variety of crops and a hunting business.

 

Kopriva Angus

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Kopriva AngusJim and Karen Kopriva purchased their first land in Clark County in 1991, but credit Karen’s parents, Harold and Mary Hurlbert, with helping them establish their farm. Karen’s family has been in Clark County since 1880 and her parents have helped both their daughters’ families get started in agriculture. Over one third of the operation’s land base is land that has been in Karen’s family for three generations.

 

Mortenson Ranch

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Mortenson RanchAt the end of the 1940s, Clarence Mortenson began to wonder how all of the water originating on his ranch could be kept there for use over an extended period of time. This idea sparked his effort to restore the ranch to its natural state. Clarence’s vision has been embraced by his sons, Todd, Jeff, and Curt, who currently operate Mortenson Ranch.

 

Rock Hills Ranch

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Rock Hills RanchHolistic resources management focused on long-term sustainability is a way of life at Rock Hills Ranch. Lyle and Garnet Perman, along with their son Luke and his wife Naomi, raise crops and Angus cattle on the 7,500-acre ranch near Lowry.