U.S. Department of Agriculture

What We Do

We provide leadership on food, agriculture, natural resources, rural development, nutrition, and related issues based on public policy, the best available science, and effective management.

We have a vision to provide economic opportunity through innovation, helping rural America to thrive; to promote agriculture production that better nourishes Americans while also helping feed others throughout the world; and to preserve our Nation's natural resources through conservation, restored forests, improved watersheds, and healthy private working lands.

Who We Are

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is made up of 29 agencies and offices with nearly 100,000 employees who serve the American people at more than 4,500 locations across the country and abroad.

How We Work

Our weekly reviews highlight the importance of our mission and the work we do which touches the lives of Americans, every day. The core values described in our strategic plan provide our workforce with direction and goals along with milestones that we use to measure our progress, and help to guide decisions about our budget, programs and services.

Our History

On May 15, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed legislation to establish the United States Department of Agriculture and two and a half years later in his final message to Congress, Lincoln called USDA "The People's Department." Through our work on food, agriculture, economic development, science, natural resource conservation and other issues, USDA has impacted the lives of generations of Americans.


Contact U.S. Department of Agriculture


1400 Independence Ave., S.W.
Washington, DC  20250
Phone: (202) 720-2791

 

Service Area

National Program


Related Success Stories for U.S. Department of Agriculture

Appalachian National Scenic Trail
Eighty year-old public/private partnership manages the 2,175 mile-long Appalachian Trail from Maine to Georgia.

Binational Ocelot Recovery Project
Conservation agencies, organizations and foundations in Texas and Tamaulipas, Mexico team up with landowners to save the endangered ocelot through incentives-based stewardship.

GIS Environmental Master Plan
Assisting Smaller Communities with environmental remediation, land use planning, and other activities by supplying GIS data and technical expertise.

North Central Texas Water Quality
Develop watershed management plans for six reservoirs in the Trinity River Basin providing water for 1.6 million people.

NYC Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program
New York City, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), agricultural producers, and others address non-point source pollution through voluntary programs that protect stream corridors and working land.

Restoration at Kankakee Sands
Restoration of both hydrology and native plants on fragments of farmland will add to a mosaic of stream, wetland, prairie and savanna.

Rio Grande Basin Initiative
The Rio Grande Basin is a highly productive agricultural area, with irrigated agriculture claiming more than 85 percent of its water.