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Monarch Joint Venture

The Monarch Joint Venture (MJV) is a partnership of federal and state agencies, non-governmental organizations, businesses and academic programs
working together to protect the monarch migration across the United States.

As a leader in monarch conservation, the MJV supports monarch conservation planning and implementation efforts on a broad scale by facilitating information sharing, partnership building, and carrying out identified conservation priorities. We facilitate multiple working groups that focus on things like communications, agriculture, and monitoring. Additionally, the MJV funds our partners to carry out priority actions identified in the Implementation Plan. Beyond this, we provide key and accessible information on monarchs and their conservation to various sectors and the public.


Contact Monarch Joint Venture

REMINDER: This listing is a free service of LandCAN.
Monarch Joint Venture is not employed by or affiliated with the Land Conservation Assistance Network, and the Network does not certify or guarantee their services. The reader must perform their own due diligence and use their own judgment in the selection of any professional.


Contact Monarch Joint Venture


2161 University Ave W.
Suite 200
St. Paul, Minnesota  55114


 

Service Area

National service provider


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2 Introductory articles were found for Monarch Joint Venture

Monarch Conservation Implementation Plan

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The Monarch Conservation Implementation Plan was derived from the North American Monarch Conservation Plan (CEC, 2008), and is updated annually by the Monarch Joint Venture (MJV), a national conservation partnership currently consisting of over 50 organizations working together to conserve the monarch migration.

North American Monarch Conservation Plan objectives include:

1. Threats Prevention, Control and Mitigation

2. Innovative Enabling Approaches

3. Research, Monitoring, Evaluation and Reporting

4. Education, Outreach, and Capacity Building



 

Mowing and Management: Best Practices for Monarchs

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Understanding when monarchs are present allows land managers to time management practices like burning, mowing, grazing, or targeted pesticide application when they are least likely to harm monarchs. Monarchs can be harmed when eggs and caterpillars on milkweed plants or adult monarchs seeking nectar from flowers are present during management, or when habitat is removed at critical points in their life cycle. The recommendations in this document are intended to reduce harm to monarchs based on breeding and migration activity.