Davis Bayou Preservelast updated: March 2013
The primary boundary of this 1,410-acre preserve, located in Jackson County, follows the edge of the non-forested estuarine marsh along the Davis Bayou, Stark Bayou, Heron Bayou, and Simmons Bayou. The upper portions of Davis Bayou are largely a mid-level needle rush (Juncus roemerianus) dominated marsh with a mosaic of other elevation zones such as big cordgrass (Spartina cynosuroides) in pure stands on the higher ground mixed with Juncus, salt-meadow grass (Spartina patens), and narrow disjunct bands of smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora). The lower portions of the bayou are composed of a mid-level needle rush (Juncus roemerianus) and low level smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) zones. Olneyi rush (Scirpus olneyi) and saltmarsh bulrush (Scirpus robustus) can also be found mixed with the saltgrass (Distichlis spicata). The upper, oligohaline area of Davis Bayou is largely a mid-level needle rush (Juncus roemerianus) dominated marsh with a mosaic of other elevation zones. This stretch of the bayou borders part of the Mississippi Sandhill Crane Refuge to the south. Plants include the needle rush (Juncus roemerianus), which dominates the mid-level zone; big cordgrass (Spartina cynosuroides) in pure stands on higher ground and mixed with Juncus; salt-meadow grass (Spartina patens) in high marsh areas, and narrow, disjunct bands of smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora). The plants occur on hummocks that can be as much as 5-10 cm higher than interplant bare areas. What appears to be widgeon-grass (Ruppia) can be observed along the edge of the bayou. The oligohaline mid-section of Davis Bayou is composed of mid-level needle rush (Juncus roemerianus) dominated marsh. Big cordgrass (Spartina cynosuroides) occurs mixed with the Juncus, and smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) occurs as narrow, disjunct bands along the bayou. Some cypress and sawgrass occur along the upland edge and spike-rush (Eleocharis parvula) forms a dense cover on the substrate in openings in the marsh. The lower, mesohaline area of Davis Bayou is composed of mid-level needle rush (Juncus roemerianus) and low level smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) zones. Salt-meadow grass (Spartina patens) forms narrow bands adjacent to uplands or dunes. Olneyi bulrush (Scirpus olneyi) and saltmarsh bulrush (Scirpus robustus) can be found mixed with saltgrass (Distichlis spicata). Although not visited, the peninsula that forms the southern border of Davis Bayou contains these major zones as well as a dune system on the Mississippi Sound side. Brown and white pelicans commonly use the narrow sand spit located at the tip of the peninsula (Marsh Point).   Residences with open septic systems threaten the ecological integrity.
       
Rare/Endangered Species:
  • Pelecanus occidentalis Brown Pelican
  • Notropis petersoni Coastal Shiner
  • Macroclemys temminckii Alligator Snapping Turtle
  • Malaclemys terrapin Diamondback Terrapin
  • Charadrius alexandrinus Snowy Plover
  • Malaclemys terrapin pilea Mississippi Diamondback Terrapin
  • Nerodia clarkii clarkii Gulf Salt Marsh Snake
  • Hibiscus coccineus Brilliant Hibiscus
  • Andropogon capillipes Chalky Broomsedge
Boaters and anglers use the area on occasional and seasonal basis for fishing.
 
For Comments and/or Additional Information on Davis Bayou, email the Coastal Preserves Manager.

Contact Davis Bayou Preserve

MS Department of Marine Resources
3500 Park Road
Ocean Springs, Mississippi  39564
Phone: (228) 374-5000
Toll Free: (800) 374-3449
Fax: (228) 374-5005

 

Service Area

Statewide service provider in:
  • Mississippi


To request additions or corrections to this entry email the Administrator